Skip to main content

About your Search

20121201
20121231
SHOW
STATION
CSPAN 21
CSPAN2 1
LANGUAGE
English 22
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22
on the skilled work force or how much there is a skill gap, i think this is a critical issue. i think that for us to have clear policies, we need to do a little better in clearly defining the challenge. first of all, i don't think there is any question that the main reason we are having higher unemployment right now is not structural. it is fundamentally cyclical, fundamentally the lack of demand that is still in our economy as we recover from the great recession. that said, that awareness, that recognition that ben bernanke and former cea sheriff lazar -- cea chair lazear should not undermine that we face temporary or futures skills gaps but there is three reasons we should be focused on this. number one, even the unemployment today that is fundamentally about cyclical demand can easily become the next structural skills problem of the future. we know that one of the challenges we face right now in our economy is not just lowering unemployment, but lower and long-term unemployment, and that if we allow regions of our fellow citizens to stay unemployed for year or two years or longer, we know from
george w. bush signed into law. his wife, former first lady laura bush, is with us today, as is her predecessor, secretary of state hillary clinton. coming together in mutual respect, a step from the chambers where we passionately debate the issues of the day that has become almost second nature to us. but it is a blessing, and we will hear over and over during the course of this ceremony, aung san suu kyi has shown the world just how hard one it really is. on behalf of the congress, let me express how humble and honored we are by your presence here in the rotunda of the united states capitol. >> ladies and gentlemen, please stand for the presentation of the callers by the united states armed forces color guard, the singing of our national anthem, and the retiring of the colors. ♪ ♪ ♪ oh say can you see by the dawn's early light, what so proudly we hail at the twilight's last gleaming, whose broad stripes and bright stars, through the perilous fight, o'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming, and the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air, i gave proof t
. to start us down the road of making our children safer by treating children's gun safety like their auto safety. all the air bags, anti-drunk driving campaigns, child seats, driver education, careful licensing, it slashed the accident rate but it didn't eliminate them altogether. we can't imagine a world without these protections for our families. let's see if we can imagine a world where our children are safer from gun violence. and then make it happen. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. the chair recognizes the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. murphy, for five minutes. mr. murphy: madam speaker, i rise today with a heavy heart, to honor petty officer nicholas , a person who sacrificed his life in the most honorable of ways, to protect and save the life of another human being. his life was a testament to the core values of the united states navy, honor, courage and commitment. on december 9, twelve, pet -- 2012, the petty officer rescued ar kidnapped american doctor from the taliban near kabul. a veteran of the iraq war and a decorated navy seal, the petty officer died durin
passed in may but it's an important support program to make sure that the most vulnerable among us are cared for and they can bounce back up. it's one of those programs where we try to reach out, mr. speaker, not to prop folks up but to give them a hand up so that they can succeed. . these programs face a 35% cut. why is that? in the two years you and i have been here, mr. speaker, we have seen discretionary spending, it started in 2010 at some of the highest levels in american history. you and i in a bipartisan way brought it down in 2011. we brought it down again in 2012. and we brought it down again for f.y. 2013. i open up those newspapers, mr. speaker, folks talk about how there is no agreement here. folks are arguing and fighting with each other. in a bipartisan way this house, that senate, and our president has seen discretionary spending drop three years in a row. never before in my lifetime have we seen such a thing. i credit this body with being a driving force in that because we were elected by the american people who want to see their fiscal bucks put back in order, but
just how nonlife- u.s. unemployment benefits are. a lot of the against -- non- lavish u.s. unemployment benefits are. the two countries that he mentioned, the netherlands and belgium, they're doing much better than other continental european countries. the scandinavian countries have guest: there is not this simple relationship that have been extensive unemployment insurance system and you mechanically generate a higher unemployment rate. host: lisa from dallas, texas, received unemployment insurance -- nate from dallas, texas, receives unemployment insurance. caller: right now i lost my job because my boss was fired from the university. and recently got my doctoral degree from that university, and i am spending eight hours a day on the computer, trying to network. i want to buck the contention that it is a mismatch of skills between the employer and the people that are unemployed. there was a recent "wall street journal" saying that part of the problem is how employers conduct searches of candidates, and her recruiting is done. -- how recruiting is done. i think the unemployment benefi
. . this is where the u.s. needs to stand firm. it's how we can stand firm for freedom. i encourage the passage of this resolution, and i encourage that we as a body will continue to stand for a free and open internet. and with that i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. the question is will the house suspend the rules and agree to senate concurrent resolution 50. as many as are in favor will signify by saying aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair -- black plaque mr. speaker, i ask for a recorded vote. the speaker pro tempore: 2/3 having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the concurrent resolution is agreed to -- mrs. blackburn: i ask for the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. all those in favor of taking this vote by the yeas and nays will rise and remain standing until counted. a sufficient number having arisen, the yeas and nays are ordered. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20 and the chair's prior announcement, further proceedings on this motion will
gdp, the entire economic output of the u.s. they have come down a little bit. economists think to be sustainable, budget deficits have to be in the range of 3% of economic output or a lower. the focus of this effort to reduce deficits now is on getting them, in the federal budget deficit to the range of 3% or so. that is what i mean when i say policymakers are not trying to get rid of the budget deficits. given the economic weakness, a little bit of deficit spending is probably not a terrible thing, at least in the eyes of some budget economists. i think there would be comfort in washington around 3% of gdp. getting there is a big challenge. there are problems with medicare and social security. they are facing big deficit situations. host: what motivates the creation of deductions? what about the other incentives? mortgage deduction it to encourage people to buy a home. guest: some of the deductions have been around forever, since the invention of the income tax. there has always been a deduction for interest that you paid. the government didn't think it could distinguish betwe
to us there wasn't anything we couldn't do. there is no limits as to how far we can go. we have limits because we got here late, the language, the skills, but you can be anything you want. and i can't tell you how important that is for a young person to not only have dreams and believe those dreams are possible. if i worry about anything, i spoke about this last night, young americans aren't dreaming or aren't believing the dreams are accessible to them. >> >> you mentioned mitt romney who until three weeks ago was the leader of the party. mitt romney going to disappear or does he have a continuing role? >> i hope he doesn't disappear and hope he has a continuing role. first of all, very few people have done what he has done, run for president and be the nominee of the party. >> and get crushed. >> that's not accurate. he got 47%. he won a lot of states. he didn't lose 49-1. he won places and has a lot of supporters. but he has been successful at life. and i told him this, too. mitt romney is a role model as a person, a father, husband, community leader. he has a lot to offer the repub
everything to try to hold on. and yet, here is the u.s. senate saying, hey, it's okay that we're not helping you now because you know what? we're going to help you in the farm bill. well, where is the farm bill? it's not on the president's desk. it isn't in route to the president's desk. it hasn't even been brought up on the floor of the u.s. house. a bipartisan group of senators in this body approved a farm bill and had the disaster relief for our ranchers and farmers in it and sent it over to the house, and it's never been discussed. that is completely unacceptable. it is a moral failure to leave those struck by disaster stranded. well, tonight 55 senators agree it is unacceptable. we should help right now. but you know what? under the budget point of order that was put forward, you needed 60 votes. we needed 60 votes tonight to help our ranchers and farmers. we only had 55. now here's the interesting thing. this budget point of order is supposed to be about saving money, but this body already approved all of those disaster relief programs in the farm bill. and when that farm bill is done,
of default at the time. what happened in 2011, as we all know because we all lived it, most of us in this room, was the threat of default, a willingness expressed by many to see the american economy under default and with all the consequent impacts on the global economy and on the american middle class. . in order to do that and was enormously damaging to consumer confidence. we were downgraded famously and it is a testament to the american people and the american economy and the american business and some of the success we have had working with the congress that we have been able to rebound and the economy continues to grow and create jobs but that was a self-inflicted wound and we can't have that nonsense anymore. >> ok for people to engage in that kind of nonsense -- >> i appreciate the question and i refer you to my comments back then. >> people voting the way obama did. >> what happened in 2011, republicans in congress demanded and said they would let america default if they did not get the items on their agenda. that was consequential and unprecedented and the result was bad
on church grounds. i'm pleading with our leaders to help us. >> my name is nardine jeffries, i'm here on behalf of my daughter, reshelle jones who was murdered on south capitol street, she was 16 years old and my only child with an ak-47 . >> my name is jose, i lost my son seven years ago, thank you. >> my name is kate hinckley, i'm here to give a voice to my baby sister, kirsten, who was killed when she was 15 at charlie square in salt lake city. >> i'm carolyn tuft, my daughter kirsten was killed in salt lake city. and i was also seriously injured in 2007. >> my name is peter reed, i'm here, again, as i was in april, because of my daughter, mary. she was shot and killed in her french class on the campus of virginia tech on april 16, 2007. >> my name is casey, my little brother, derrek was riddled with bullets on september 8, 2001 new york sacramento, california. -- in sacramento, california. >> my name is paul mauser, i'm the father of paul maus -- of daniel mauser who was killed in the massacre at columbine high school. >> my name is paul wilson. my beautiful wife christy lyn wilso
bill in over 60 years and most substantial reform of u.s. patent law since the 1836 patent act. the lay lee-smith a.i.a. re-establishes the united states patent system as a global standard. over the past year the patent office has worked diligently to implement the provisions of the act to ensure the bill realizes its full potential to promote innovation and create jobs. the bill that we consider today includes several technical corrections and improvements that ensure that the implementation of the bill can proceed efficiently and effectively. the bill is supported by all sectors of our economy from across the united states, including manufacturers, university, technology, pharmaceutical, and biotech companies and innovators. i have also received letters in support from the coalition for 21st century patent reform which represents manufacturers, pharmaceutical, technology, defense companies, and universities. the innovation alliance which represents high-tech companies and license sure, and the b.s.a., the software alliance which represents a range of high technology and software compa
it is the gas tax that goes to building roads and highways that people use every day but not realizing that they are paying for that. a variety of other things that people use that the tax system paid for but not realizing that connection. so the whole idea you bring up, stephen, that you believe that -- to connect the taxes they are paying with what they are getting in some respects, i agree with you and that is one of the challenges. on the first point, i take exception to you saying that my request for raising the cap on social security is a knee-jerk reaction. knee-jerk reaction is a description of somebody just sort of making a decision without thinking about it. i have put a lot of thought on the issue. you and i may disagree on the best solution but i put a lot of thought into it and i think it is the best solution. it may be a solution i am not successful at achieving in terms of a final deal. but if you want to look at the long-term solvency of social security, it is a great way to address it. >> -- host: just a few thoughts, first from our facebook page from a viewer. guest:
, they haven't even taken this bill up. 414 of us voted for this bill and the senate hasn't taken it up. but i guess i shouldn't be surprised, as the budget chairman said they haven't passed a budget for three years. my gosh. you know, let's quit talking about this group of americans or that group of americans, let's talk about america as if it's one country. let's don't engage in class warfare, let's don't pit one income group or one group against each other. we're going to take a very small step today, but it's a first step and it's not an unimportant step toward cutting the national debt. the national debt in the last four years has gone up 70%. that's a staggering amount. now, let me say this, chairman bernanke for six years has come before my committee and he said that the national debt is imperiling our economic future. let me use these words. he said our economic security is at risk if we don't cut down on the debt. mr. mckeon was here speaking. secretary bob gates said it's imperiling our national security. is that theater? is the national debt an illusion? americans don't think so. an
it is and what we do. everyone here is familiar with us. the work we are going to be presenting comes from a report that will be released during the hearing, during the presentation. gao-13-74, older americans act, to improve target and to meet equity. the older americans act was passed, to buy services to older adults and help them remain in their homes and communities, and provides very important services. title 3, provides support services like transportation and home delivered meals. title 3 provides care giver support. and the title 7, it provides protection activities to protect the rights of all vulnerable elderly people. in fiscal 2012, the title three had about $1.36 billion. title 7, $22 million. obviously, with the fiscal cliff discussions, these are sort of rounding errors. but as i am sure you all know, these are services the targeted community depends heavily on. and we know america is aging. america is getting older every day. i think 10,000 people retire every day. by 2030 is as -- it is estimated 20% of the population will be aged 65 and over. this really targets services
>> let us pray. gracious god, sovereign lord of history, thank you for the exemplary impact of senator daniel ken inouye on our national history. lord, we are grateful for the excellence that distinguished his significant career for the quiet grace and dignity with which he represented the aloha state. and for the gift of discernment that enabled him to serve you faithfully for the good of america. as we express gratitude for the laudable footprints he left in the sands of time, give us your power to persevere impromptly doing what is right. may the memory of senator inouye's indefatigable faithfulness provide a benchmark for the lives of all who labor for liberty. lord, intensify our dedication to make sacrifices for the good of our nation and world as we put our trust in you to do for us immeasurably, abundantly, above all that we can ask or imagine, according to your power working in and through us. we pray in your sovereign name. amen. >> senator dan inouye was a noble soul. one of the finest men i've ever met. united states senate and entire country are poorer for his l
gives u.s. smaller role." with it, mr. speaker, i'd like to submit 1 names of american service people killed recently. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. jones: mr. speaker, it's time for congress to listen to the american people and start acting on their wishes. poll after poll shows that they want to get out of afghanistan now. they want our troops home. they want to stop seeing our young men and women die. the american people want the $10 billion a month being spent in afghanistan to be spent here in america to help all our economic problems. i do not understand why we in congress seem to be without debate about this problem in afghanistan. we are currently in the process of a bilateral security agreement that will keep our troops in afghanistan for 10 years after 2014. where is the outrage by congress? we're financially broke. we complain all the time about we can't reach it had deal or that deal. we are going over the cliff, and yet our troops are dying in afghanistan and we're spending money we don't have. mr. speaker, in the article, and i quote, the afghan governm
the dream of homeownership. this is from drake cinders -- what land use restrictions would you approve of? guest: a buy support local homeowners imposing their own -- i would support local homeowners' imposing their own restrictions. this is how it works in houston, which has no zoning. half of the residential neighborhoods have restrictions. if you live in a neighborhood without restrictions, you are allowed to petition neighbors, and if 75% agree, you can write covenants and restrictions for your neighborhood. if the developer says we think your neighborhood would be more valuable if we changed it, and we will pay you to change, you can vote to do that. that happens all the time. you get an evolutionary system that responds to demand, rather than government winds and fads. >> your thoughts about the federal housing administration, where nearly for 80 years, they have maintained a stable housing market, helping lower and middle-income families enter the housing market through government assistance. guest: that is true in places without wind use restrictions, the when you have something l
we have been talking with retiring congressional members. join us later tonight for a sixth-down we recently had with nebraska democratic senator ben nelson. he served two terms and was part of the so-called gang of 14. that is at 8:00 p.m. eastern here on c-span. here is a brief look. >> what is your thought about the art of compromise and how much it is now viewed in this city? >> well, you know, is valued to talk about it. everybody back home want people to come back to washington and work together. and then they send people back here who have committed not to work together. that makes it very difficult. if you have in the senate in block of individuals who will not compromise and think of compromise as a for that -- as a four-letter word, which is not, then it becomes difficult to merge ideas and find compromises and accommodations in process or implementation as opposed to your principles. no one is asked to compromise his or her principles when you are talking about compromise. maybe how you go about doing something, not exactly eliminating your view about one thing or another
with everyone in our country paying his or her fair share. so this rule today that says give us authority to have other bills brought to the floor, well, one of those bills is the middle income tax cut, we are happy with that. but if that isn't the plan, then i urge my colleagues to vote no on the previous question because that will then enable us to bring a rule to the floor which calls for bringing forth the middle income tax cut before we leave here. again, we support the president and his proposal, which is fair, which reduces the deficit, which creates jobs, and which will work for the american people. with that i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. gentleman from texas. mr. session: thank you very much, mr. speaker. with great respect to my dear friend, the gentlewoman from san francisco, and the minority leader, i'm delighted that she came down to engage us on this very important issue. the gentlewoman does recognize and know that the house on august 1, in fact, did exactly what she has suggested that they, and that is to t
have always carried a little recording device of some sort. they used to be pretty big, but now they are quite small, and i always carry a pen and paper, and i am ready if something occurs to me. >> you mentioned merle travis. what other musicians? >> ry cooder is my favorite guitar player, but there are many others to choose from. there was an album that was a formative for me. "paradise and lunch." there was a guy coming up called tom rush who played here at the cellar door, and he played in boston at the 47. i really pattern myself after, just a guy with a guitar, full position, unapologetic. -- falcon musician. unapologetic folk musician. and i would say wouldtwo and the beatles. >> what do you think of current pop music? >> you know, i guess i do not like it a whole lot. [laughter] [applause] >> i guess i don't like it a whole lot. >> what would we find -- >> i sound just like my dad. there are great people out there, i know it. and i don't mean to condemn it but i think it's passed me by a little bit. i still have a wonderful career and a beautiful audience that i really l
. >> can you explain to us which group is your largest supporter and which groups you won't and what your reasoning is? >> tomorrow, depp ste -- deputy secretary of state burns will attend the friends of syrian people meeting in morocco. we'll do all we can to broaden support of the syrian coalition and work with like-minded countries to bring this crisis to an end. we're pleased with their continued efforts to organize, corm technical -- form technical committees and take concrete steps to form a union fid, just, democratic future for syria. these are in line with what we and our international partners would result from the formation of the commission last month. as we look at ongoing efforts to support the syrian people, let me be clear 24e678 united states stands with the syrian people in insist that can any transition process result in a peaceful, unified, democratic syria in which all citizens are protected and a future of this kind cannot inlewd al-assad. >> [inaudible] >> that's correct. we provide significant assistance to the syrian people, we proside significant, not lethal, ass
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)